:

Project Details

Early Career

Status: Funded - Open


Advanced noninvasive wide field retinal imaging technology for safer detection of pediatric retinal diseases

Hema Ramkumar, MD

Summary

BACKGROUND: More than 12 million school-age children have a vision problem, but only 14% of children get an eye exam before entering first grade. New ultra wide field retinal imaging technologies can help detect disease early and target treatments.

GAP: Because it is difficult to examine all areas of the retina in an active child, infants at high risk for disease get retinal imaging with contact viewing lenses under general anesthesia. Ultra wide field imaging performed with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope can obtain high-resolution images in less than one minute, allowing for evaluation of the retina with a noncontact viewing system in children of all ages.

HYPOTHESIS: I hypothesize that high quality ultra wide field images can be obtained in the majority of children and that ultra wide field images will be as effective as the clinical exam at detecting retinal pathology. I also hypothesize that the evaluation of the retina will be improved using ultra wide field images in patient with limited cooperation with the standard clinical examination.

METHODS: Approximately 175 children ages 3 to 17 will be prospectively enrolled for retinal evaluation with outpatient ultra wide field imaging. Predicted cooperativity and area of retina evaluated will be quantified and compared with image quality and area of the retina evaluated with ultra wide field imaging.

RESULTS: The primary outcomes of this study are detection of retinal pathology and ability to obtain a complete retinal evaluation with all areas of the retina examined. Results are pending.

IMPACT: This study will be quantify the utility of ultra wide field imaging for diagnosing retinal disease in children. This technology can improve outpatient detection of blinding and potentially life threatening disease and preserve vision in children.










Supervising Institution:
University of California, San Diego

Mentor(s):
William Freeman

Project Location:
California

Award Amount:
$26,750

project-details