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Project Details

E.W. "Al" Thrasher

Status: Funded - Open


Intensive home-based treadmill training and walking attainment in young children with cerebral palsy

Katrin Mattern-Baxter, PT, DPT, PCS

Summary

BACKGROUND: The achievement of walking is the most frequently stated goal of families of young children with cerebral palsy (CP), but ninety percent of children have difficulty walking and receive only weekly physical therapy to address their movement needs. However, neuroplastic changes to the young brain can best be made with a much higher dose of intervention which is specific to the task that is being practiced, such as during intensive treadmill training.

GAP: This study is designed to find the optimal dosage of home-based treadmill training needed to accelerate walking onset and to examine the long-term effects on walking activity in pre-ambulatory children with CP.

HYPOTHESIS: A more intensive protocol of treadmill training will increase walking onset and increase overall walking activity compared to a less intensive protocol in young children with CP.

METHODS: In this prospective randomized controlled trial, two groups of 12 pre-ambulatory children with CP under the age of 3 years will receive either home-based high-intensity treadmill training or low-intensity treadmill training. The children will be assessed before, immediately after, at 1-month and at 4-months following the intervention via standardized outcome measures.

RESULTS: Pending

IMPACT: The results of this study will lead to a paradigm shift in service delivery that will have a large impact in the provision of early intervention services for children with CP. It will lead to a cost-effective way of providing evidence-based treadmill interventions during a critical period of motor development in these young children.

Website Link: http://www.csus.edu/hhs/pt/contact%20us%20pages/KatrinMatternBaxterPTDPTPCS.html

Keywords:
Cerebral Palsy, Exercise, Treatment, Human, Randomized Clinical Trial










Supervising Institution:
California State University, Sacramento

Project Location:
Washington, California, Washington

Award Amount:
$150,001

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